Boyer Brandsen Electronic Ignition in 1979-1980 R65 Points Bean Can install

1980 Red R65 BMW

1980 Red R65 BMW

Although the directions are fairly clear, I went looking online for some installation help while installing a Boyer Brandsen electronic ignition on a R65 BMW that I am fixing up for a friend.

So… here is my install procedure.  I am open to suggestions or tips but this is how my install went.

The carbs were tuned nicely before doing this install. The idle never seemed to get low enough which might indicate ignition problems, or tight valves but the valves were adjusted to spec.
I might suggest you get a spare bean can to perform this on.  You end up modifying the original can  somewhat and it may be difficult if you ever want to go back to stock.

 

Boyer Brandsen Micro Digital ignition system.

Boyer Brandsen Micro Digital ignition system.

I purchased this from Moto Bins in the UK and it arrived within a week.

Of course, you want to disconnect your negative cable from your battery before starting the procedure.
Gastank Removal is necessary for the wiring.
And remove the front engine timing cover.
I took the bean can cover off and front bearing before I started shooting photos.  I was too eager to peek inside the bean can and see what is in there (It is my first time with a points in a can bike).

 

IMG_9299I then removed the bean can from the bike.

R65 Timing cover removal

R65 Timing cover removal and removal of the ignition can.

Removed points in can 1979 - 80 BMW ignition system

Removed points in can 1979 – 80 BMW ignition system

The large circlip needs to come out to disassemble the internals of the can.

The large circlip needs to come out to disassemble the internals of the can.

The points come out easily and then you need to remove the points base plate.

The points come out easily and then you need to remove the points base plate.

Notice the ‘e’ circlip on the center shaft.  Put a rag over the can when you remove that clip just in case it tries to go flying across the garage.  The rag might catch it.

Points base plate removed

Points base plate removed.

The cam has to come off the shaft and you then need to remove the springs to slide off the contact breaker unit.

Circlip removed from the center shaft. The cam has to come off the shaft and you then need to remove the springs to slide off the contact breaker unit.

After you get the center cam removed, be careful with the very small circlips that hold the bob weights.  Those need to come off to get the bob weights off.

Bob weights and center cam removed.

Bob weights and center cam removed.

Now it is time for assembly of the electronic ignition!

This was the first hiccup.  The magnetic rotor does not fit into the housing properly without bending the spring mounting tabs.  They are not easy to bend so it took some work.

Prepping for magnetic rotor install

Prepping for magnetic rotor install

Note the next photo.  The tabs have to align with the notches where the tiny circlips were. The new rotor should sit flat, spin freely and the large clip should secure it to the center shaft.

Magnetic rotor installed

Magnetic rotor installed

Another small snag.  When the stator plate was installed with the cord going out the square hole, and the mounting screws were tightened, the magnetic rotor would not spin freely.  It was a head scratcher in which everything was taken apart, put together again a few times.  Finally by rotating the stator plate 180 degrees and making sure everything spins freely before securing the mounting screws, it happily went together.

Install of the stator plate

Install of the stator plate

Stator plate with cable going out rubber grommit hole vs square hole.

Stator plate with cable going out rubber grommit hole vs square hole.

Now it is time to install the can back on the bike.  IMG_9317

The very large circlip went in and the center bearing plate installed.

The very large circlip went in and the center bearing plate installed.

I removed the diode board so I could route the wires behind it.

Removed Diode Board for wire routing

Removed Diode Board for wire routing

Control unit tucked and strapped to the frame components.

Control unit tucked and strapped to the frame components. It seemed like a tidy place to put it between the two coils.

The green wire connects with the existing green wire terminal on the rear ignition coil.
I also connected the ground wire to the coil mount bolt as well.

IMG_9322

Not photographed but I made about a 12inch extension wire to connect the black wire from the ignition unit all the way to the other coil to replace the wire on the terminal that was connected to the old points condensor. For some reason, they put shrink tubing on the wiring as if they all connect in the same vicinity.  It was either make an extension wire, or cut up the clean tubing so the black wire could reach over to the other coil.

It is all wired up and now time to set the timing.
IMG_9320
I am not used to these flywheels so timing it took a bit of back and fourth.  There is no ‘F’ mark on the flywheel.  But there is the OT and a Z-dot.

Once I got it timed, and I fussed with the idle a bit, it ran great.  Really smooth and more responsive then before.

 

 

Final drive spline rehab

I can’t remember the condition of this final drive when I assembled my 77 R100s back in 2003.  When I had my rear tire replaced recently, I noticed how terrible the splines are. The splines on the wheel are better then the final drive but they will need replacing someday too.

I found this drive with the same ratio and cleaned it up and replaced the spline.  Now it is time to swap the drives.

While it is apart, I am taking the opportunity to pull the tranny back and lube the clutch splines as well.

Bmw final drive spline

Bmw R100S final drive spline replacement

BMW R90/6 Rear wheel bearing install

Back to Beemers…
I’m working on a project bike for a friend and had the items powder coated satin black. I’m very excited to see how this bike will turn out.
And yes, I have a very messy garage/workbench at the moment.
I removed the wheel bearings and the races with lots of heat, and the help of a press.
Then went to the powder coat shop and gave them the masking instructions.

Here are some photos of the install.
Not pictured is the process of checking and testing the bearings in the race to make sure they spin smoothly.
If not, clean them, re-test, and clean them again, etc…
Then grease ’em good!
Also not pictured is the process of cleaning the inside of the hub REALLY well. Especially since they were sand blasted.
And.. then there is the process of pre-loading the bearings, freezing them for a day, heating the hub and then ‘plop’, you are done.

Bearings from when I pulled them from the hub.
WheelBearing1

Clean Hub:
WheelBearing2

Preloaded bearing stack. I have a piece of steel pipe that I put on the other side of the stack with the axle to help with the preload.
WheelBearing3

A nice propping set up for when it is all heated. These are damaged cork Yoga blocks that a yoga company couldn’t sell. I happily found a home for them in my garage and they come in handy!
WheelBearing4

Frozen bearing stack and axle dropped into that toasty hot hub.
WheelBearing5

Torn apart and giving the engine a bath

The manual available for this bike is old, with terrible photos. So I am snapping shots of everything while I take it apart. How would this happen in the film days??? Expensively I guess…
Pixels are cheap.
More Photos to come…

Bridgestone 175 rear brake hub.  Looks like it will polish up OK.

Bridgestone 175 rear brake hub. Looks like it will polish up OK.

Bridgestone 175  rotary 2 stroke engine getting a bath in on the parts washer.  It was filthy.

Bridgestone 175 rotary 2 stroke engine getting a batch in on the parts washer. It was filthy.

Bridgestone 175HS rear sprockets.  I can't wait to clean these up.  They are a nice feature on the bike.

Bridgestone 175HS rear sprockets. I can’t wait to clean these up. They are a nice feature on the bike.

The Bridgestone 175 Hurricane Scrambler

I have no idea what draws us to certain bikes… but I saw this for sale, cheap, and I had to get it.  I think the toaster tank had something to do with it.    It is a 1967 Bridgestone 175 Hurricane Scrambler.

I’m waiting for a bunch of custom BMW parts (in development), that this seemed like a good place to put that antsy restoration energy.

Supposedly, Bridgestone made such great bikes that they were pressured by other Japanese motorcycle companies to stop making motorcycles, otherwise the other companies would stop buying the Bridgestone tires.

 

1967 Bridgestone 175 HS

1967 Bridgestone 175 HS

This bike arrived a bit rougher then I expected.  With some help of a mechanic genius at the Oshmo shop, we got it running.
It had a weak spark so I waited about a month for some parts to arrive, replaced the coils and with the help of my daughter, we got it fired up with one kick.

I have no idea why I am going to sink time and money into this bike… but she is going to get torn down for a complete restoration with some custom bits thrown in.

Stay tuned for some 2 stroke updates…